Militants vandalize eleven churches in Calgary. Police investigating as a hate crime

Media has been agitating against the Catholic church over historical boarding schools

Racial egalitarians in Canada and the USA claimed that these schools would make racial differences between Whites and Indians disappear.

Police say that eleven churches were targeted for vandalism in the Alberta city of Calgary. Militants threw red and orange paint over the churches. The Calgary Police “Hate Crime and Extremism Unit” is investigating the attack.

This comes on the heels of two Catholic churches being set on fire by arsonists last weekend. Both of these churches were located in American Indian communities in British Columbia. The two arsons occurred within an hour of each other and are believed to be politically and racially motivated.

The Canadian media has been aggressively promoting racial grievances against the Catholic church over its history of running boarding schools for Indian children.

In both the USA and Canada, there was a movement among White racial egalitarians to “uplift” the Indian communities by pressuring them to send their children to boarding schools for Western education. This movement intensified in the USA after the Emancipation Proclamation and the ending of slavery. Many in the abolitionist community believed that providing Indians children with Western-style upbringing and education was the next step in bringing about racial equality in the New World.

However, the modern-day racial egalitarians view these schools as a racial atrocity and an act of cultural genocide against American and Canadian Indian tribes. In Canada, authorities have been using ground-penetrating radar to identify unmarked graves at the site of some former schools. The remains of other two hundred children have been found.

Approximately 150,000 Indian children attended these schools in Canada, primarily from the late 1870s to the 1940s. The last schools were closed in the mid-1990s. The Canadian government began subsidizing these schools in 1883. The government launched a program to purchase the schools from churches in the 1920s. In 2008, the Canadian government established the “Truth and Reconciliation Commission” to investigate the schools. 

No one in the media, government, or activist community has attempted to compare the mortality rates of White students to Indian students during the same time period. 

Most of the churches attacked were Catholic, but not all. One of the churches vandalized is an African church for refuge